FINA reports presence of stanozolol in Matthew Zammit’s doping test

Monday, July 12, 2010, 19:57

by Sandro Micallef

Following sportinmalta’s exclusive revelation early in June that Matthew Zammit had failed a doping test during the European Championships Men’s Qualification Water Polo Tournament in Istanbul, new revelations were disclosed by FINA, the international governing body of swimming, diving, water polo, synchronized swimming and open water swimming.

According to an anti-doping report on the FINA website, the prohibited substance that was detected during Zammit’s doping test belonged to the “Class S.1.1.a Anabolic Androgenic Steroids, namely: Stanozolol”. FINA continued that according to its rules, a decision was taken to provisionally suspend Zammit “until a hearing before the FINA Doping Panel can be made”. Matthew Zammit had earlier been provisionally suspended by the ASA and also by his club, San Giljan.

The substance that was named by FINA in its statement, stanozolol, is an anabolic steroid and is a very effective body builder that help increase lean muscle mass, and it’s the steroid that Ben Johnson had tested positive for after winning the 100 metres final in 1988 Seoul Olympics.

The FINA statement, that can also be found by clicking here, is quoted below:

Provisional Suspension – Matthew Zammit (Malta)

On 1st May 2010, the athlete Matthew Zammit (MLT) underwent  in a competition a doping control test with the occasion of the Men’s Qualification Tournament for the 2010 European Water Polo Championships held in Istanbul, turkey. The analytical report showed the presence of prohibited substance belonging to Class S.1.1.a Anabolic Androgenic Steroids, namely: Stanozolol.

The FINA Executive decided, as per FINA Rule DC 7.1.11, to provisionally suspend Mr. Matthew Zammit from the 22 June 2010 until a hearing before the FINA Doping Panel can be made.

Related stories:
Maltese international tests positive in doping test
San Ġiljan’s reaction to Matthew Zammit’s failed dope test





24 Comments

  1. [...] FINA reports presence of stanozolol in Matthew Zammit’s doping test Tagged with: Matthew Zammit [...]

  2. Soler4ever says:

    @Giljaniz

    Qed narakom fuq it-television bhalissa ta San Giljan … sabiha ir-risposta li qed taghtu eh !! zewg sessions ghamiltu mas-Sliema. cirio dis-sena habib … 4-0 fit-tielet sessjoni !!! Sliema champions ergajna …

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  3. ghawdxi imhasseb says:

    xtaqt nadi kument fuq club ingenerali…otters nivea…naf kem hi difficli u isiru sforzi mil-club ghawdxi biex jitla u jikompeti malta u ta dan haqom kull tifhir…pero li ma nistax nifem kif club bhal dan hu imexxi min persuni li f mohhom mux sport biss andom imma kulur politiku biss…vera hasra li fi sport sabieh bhal dan jithallew jidhlu il-kuluri politici li ma ghandom x jaqsmu xejn.smajt hafna kummenti min geneturi li xtaqu jibatu li tfal taghhom flistess club insemi ghal tahrig u idecidew li ma iresqux li tfal l hemm.ghalekk nitlob f isem l ghawdxin kolla (ftakru li lunika club f gozo ta waterpool)biex dawn laffariet jifqu ghal dejjem! thamgux li sport mal politka.grazzi

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  4. M. Caruana says:

    @Giljaniz
    about time li tibdew tilghabu siehbi !!! … nispera illi tieqfu taqilghu go fikom (e.g. wara li tliftu ma l-Exiles ukoll!), possibbli player wiehed ghamlilkom tant differenza?!

    Nahseb se jkollok tistenna sas-sena d-diehla biex tirbhu xi haga

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    Giljaniz Reply:

    Dis sena ghalija mghaniex cans niehdu xi unur imma fejn ijlna nistenew issa nistenew ftit zmien iehor…. ahna xorta nibqaw wara team tghana imma :)

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  5. Sliema boy says:

    @abc
    I think that rather than try to silence the journalist in question, you should thank your lucky stars that such people exist, as otherwise the facts will remain forever enshrouded in mystery, and common mortals like yourself and myself would have never known the truth.

    Besides, such a factual article silenced all those people who commented on the previous related news items, defending the player and saying that he took nothing wrong etc etc. They’re nowhere to be seen now precisely because reality is staring them right in the eye.

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    Giljaniz Reply:

    Mr Sliema Boy…. we are all still behind Matthew u skit risposta ax ir risposta tghana tal giljanizi ha nuruwa gewwa il pixxina min ghada stess habib (nispera li fhiemtni ax kelimtek bil malti ta ;) )…..

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    dizzjunarju Reply:

    Giljaniz, la taf bil-malti missek taf li suppost ktibt: 1) Skiet mhux skit; 2) taghna mhux tghana: 3) Nuruha mhux nuruwa ;4) Fhimtni mhux fhiemtni u 5) Kellimtek mhux kelimtek……. flok tipprova ddahhaq ahjar taghmel ftit revision tal-malti, ghax f’zewg sentenzi nahseb qallibtu fil-qabar lil Dun Karm Psaila miskin!

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    Giljaniz Reply:

    Forsi skola mghandiex hafna imma xorta fhiemtni habib….. FIS :)

    Giljaniz Reply:

    Forsi skola ma tantx naf u ma tantx naf nispelli… imma allinqas naf nitkellem il lingwa tijej u anke naf nitkellem bl inglis….. mhux bhal tas sliema sal ingwa tal inglis nasal…… SZIF forever ;)

    Lex Reply:

    Dear abc for your information all those who defended Matthew r still here and we will keep on doing. We are just fed up of hearing comments like yours. Only we know exactly what happened and we will try to prove it. If you see our previous comments we never said that Mat did not take anything, what we said is that he did not take any drugs or any type of sports enhancements as it was written in Sandro’s article. To all of those who enjoyed writing comments against Mat and trying to make matters worst, watch out cos he will be back kicking some asses.

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    joey Reply:

    that is if he makes it in time. dont forget about the world ends in 2012

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    Lex Reply:

    Really funny you made us laugh, get a life. My previous comment was for Sliema boy not for abc sorry.

  6. abc says:

    Sandro
    This must be a very sensistive case as it is evident that the player, as well as Ben Johnson, did not have the drug to cure a simple cold. The player must have answered straightforward questions when he was being investigated and its useless for anybody to come to other hazy conclusions. The FINA decision follows the information the player divulged to the officials investigating his case. So further talk would only be superfluous and more harm could be done to the player if importance is given to speculative rumours.
    I suggest you close correspondence on this subject. What do you think?

    [Sportinmalta] Thank you for taking the time to visit sportinmalta. I would like to clarify one point in your comment regarding the importance that is being given to “speculative rumours”. I would like to assure you that my article above is based on facts that were made public by FINA and is therefore not based on rumours at all. With regards to “closing the correspondence on this subject” I believe that as a professional journalist I should let the public know of any new facts related to this incident.

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    abc Reply:

    Sandro
    Thanks for your reply. But I wrote that because the facts were those revealed by you… yes, exactly those written by you. Hats off for that!
    Newcomers to the site, however, continue to speculate and this is what I think will harm the player’s morale apart from his reputation. The story is now well-known and that is why I now suggest, for the sake of the player, not to accept any further correspondence on this subject (NOT withdraw the story from the site as some may have thought).

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  7. mario ellul says:

    eh tajjeb ukoll din gdida mela mhux kollu tort tal-player zammit….. tista` l-asa tispjega u tikkonferma jekk inghatatax din il-formula u jekk le ghaliex. 50 % tat- tort huwa tal-ASA mela. mario

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  8. Chris Bonnici says:

    @joey
    I wonder if you read the FINA rules on anti-doping. I just logged onto their website to check out the facts and found the following:
    DC 4.4.1 Competitors with a documented medical condition requiring the use of a Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method must first obtain a Therapeutic Use Exemption (“TUE”). Presence of a Prohibited Substance or its Metabolites or Markers (DC 2.1), Use or Attempted Use of a Prohibited Substance and or a Prohibited Method (DC 2.2), Possession of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods (DC 2.6) or Administration of a Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Methods (DC 2.8) consistent with the provisions of an applicable TUE and issued pursuant to the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions shall not be considered an anti-doping rule violation.

    In a nutshell, if the player in question was taking “a simple flu remedy” then he should have informed the ASA to include the “simple flu remedy” in the TUE form, which then needs to be approved by FINA for him to participate. This according to FINA would “not be considered an anti-doping rule violation”. This is crystal clear and negligence to take note of the above is not a good enough excuse.

    So to wrap it all up, the ASA should tell us all whether it asked its players to fill in a TUE form before the tournament, and if it did so then the blame lies fair and square on the player. If this wasn’t the case, then the player AND the ASA/medical staff should shoulder the blame for all this.

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    joey Reply:

    Chris I was being sarcastic. Im sure you yourself dont make use of steroids to fight a flu hahaha. Im happy this finally came out as his family members can no longer claim that they and they alone know the truth behind the story. Matthew was cheating and this finally proves it

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    Chris Bonnici Reply:

    Sorry joey!
    And i agree fully that after people tried to keep everything under wraps, FINA came along and burst their bubble! Iz-zejt dejjem jitla f’wicc l-ilma

    Would be interesting to see how San Giljan, who this year invested a lot in beefing up their team, will react to this piece of news. Especially in the light of the fact that had they been told before, they would have got a left handed player which they sorely need.

    Oh and i re-iterate my point on the ASA and the TUE form. Was it signed? Was it ever presented to the player?

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    h20 Reply:

    chris bonnice the TUE form is not given to every player to sign it…. it is a form that if a player is under medication flu remedy head aches…… or chronical one diabetes, astma etc… signs
    and these are the onyl cases where one can sign it and make use of the durgs..

    when it is a case of someone taking steroids, or any other form of vitamins or drugs or whatever it is not singed and even if it was. It doesnt mean u can fill in this form and take STANOZOL better known as winstrol (all u need is a google search).

    if for whatever reason you are taking this steroid you cannot compete in any sport

    Chris Bonnici Reply:

    Thanks h20 for the clarification.
    I know for a fact that other local associations approach their athletes before an important competition like small nations games, european championships, commonwealth games etc to ask them if they took any medication, drugs etc 2-6 months prior to the competition in question. I’m assuming that the ASA adopts the same procedure.

  9. Drop it says:

    Can you please explain how the coach can actually suspect and investigate one of his player’s. Never heard that in my life. The coach is meant to trust and have faith in what his player’s do. A coach is not there to investigate his player’s but to prepare them for a tournament. Afric was with Matthew only for a couple of weeks and it is impossible to tell.

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  10. joey says:

    my sincere apologies. i guess we were all very wrong in thinking that they were drug enhancers. This article clearly explains that they were a simple flu remedy.

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  11. lawrence@onvol.net says:

    shame on the player and shame on afric cos he as coach should have investigated any minor suspects he might have had sandro

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